Posts Tagged hockey 101

Hockey: Suiting Up For The First Time

New players to the game of hockey inevitably face the task of putting on all their gear for the first time. While getting dressed in all that gear seems like a daunting task, it’s really not as difficult as it sounds. New players may want to practice a few times at home until they feel comfortable.

Remember that all your gear is adjustable. If it doesn’t fit quite right the first time, try adjusting them until you find the right fit.

Here is a step by step guide to putting on hockey equipment:
1. Put on your undergarments. These can be compression shorts or jock shorts. Jock Shorts have a pocket for a cup and velcro tabs on the front and back of each leg to attach your hockey socks to. Jock shorts can be worn over compression pants. Some compression shorts also have a cup pocket with the velcro tabs.

2. Step into your athletic cup by putting both feet through the elastic waistband. Secure the garter belt around your waist, making sure that it fits snugly and comfortably around the groin area but is not too tight.

3. Put on your Hockey Pants/Girdle. Tighten your pants with the belt so that the pants fit comfortably but provide for adequate flexibility. If they are still too loose, you can use a pair of suspenders to keep them up.

4. Put on your shin guards (these will go under your hockey socks). Make sure that you leave enough space near your ankles for your skates. Some shin-guards have straps that can be tightened. Others need to be secured with hockey socks.

5. Hockey Socks are long cotton socks that are open on the top and the bottom. Your hockey socks go over your shin pads and attach to your garter belt.

6. Put on your skates and tie them very tight without cutting off circulation to your feet. The bottom of your knee pad should come just to the tongue of your skate. Tape everything in place.

7. Shoulder Pads go over the compression shirt or t-shirt. Slip your head through the middle hole and put your arms through the arm bands underneath the shoulder plate. Tighten the straps until the shoulder pads are secure but allow adequate range of motion.

8. Elbow Pads go over your long sleeve compression shirt. The joint of your elbow should rest squarely in the cup of the elbow pads. Adjust the staps so the pads fit tight but are still be comfortable.

9. Neck Guard fits around the neck to protect against sharp skate blades. Most models fasten in the back with an adjustable closure.

10. Finally, put on your jersey, helmet, and gloves. Put the mouth guard in and you are ready to play!

After practice or games, be sure to remove the gear in the opposite order you put things on. Everything will then go back in the bag in the order you need them next time.

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Hockey: Icing Rule Explained

Hockey is a game of tremendous speed and constant contact. It’s also a game of strategies and techniques that can give a team an advantage. But these strategies are not always without consequence. The three major NHL rules that limit the movement of the puck are icing, off-side, and out-of-play. For now, we’ll concentrate on icing.

    What exactly is icing?

Basically, icing is a tactic whereby a player on his own side of the red line dumps the puck to the end of the ice from behind the center ice red line. If the puck crosses the opposing goal line untouched, and is then retrieved by an opposing player, icing is called. Considered a delaying tactic, it results in a stoppage in play and a face-off in the offending team’s defensive zone. The purpose of the icing rule is to encourage continuous action.

When the conditions of “icing the puck” have occurred, the referee will blow his whistle and raise his non-whistle hand over his head. Play stops and a face-off is held in the defensive zone of the team that iced the puck. The back official will then move to the face-off spot and give the icing signal.

    Why is icing a problem?

The icing rule was introduced by the NHL to prevent teams from wasting time when they were ahead late in the game, especially if the score was still close. The rule was designed to prevent a team from “dumping” the puck into their opponent’s zone in order to use up the clock or to avoid playing defense.

Before the rule, teams that were stuck in their own defensive end for too long would ice the puck just to be able to make a line change and switch out tired players. In 2005, the NHL modified the icing rule to state that the five players on the ice for the offending team must remain on the ice for the subsequent face-off. The modification resulted in fewer icing incidents since the severity of the penalty outweighed the benefit.

Please Note: The icing rule for non-pro hockey varies by league. Most leagues enforce a “no-touch” icing, in which icing is called and play is stopped as soon as the puck crosses the goal line, regardless of whether or not an opponent touches it.

    Exceptions to the rule…

One exception to the icing rule occurs when a team is shorthanded. During power play situations, the shorthanded team is allowed to dump the puck without an icing penalty being called. Icing can also be waved off if the referee determines that an opposing player could have touched the puck before it crossed the goal line.

In the NHL and AHL, a player on the opposing team other than the goaltender must touch the puck to cause the stoppage of play. If the puck is first touched by the goaltender or a player on the team that iced the puck, icing is waved off (cancelled) and play continues.

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